Human-Centered Computing Works

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Working papers, posters, reports, presentations and other works authored by members of the Department of Human-Centered Computing.

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    Indy Postcard Collector - August 2024
    (Indianapolis Postcard Club, 2024-08) Hook , Sara Anne
    The August 2024 issue of Indy Postcard Collector, published by the Indianapolis Postcard Club, edited by Sara Anne Hook, Professor Emerita.
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    Indy Postcard Collector, June 2024
    (Indianapolis Postcard Club, 2024-06) Hook , Sara Anne
    The June 2024 issue of Indy Postcard Collector, published by the Indianapolis Postcard Club, edited by Sara Anne Hook, Professor Emerita.
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    Does mind perception explain the uncanny valley effect? A meta-regression analysis and (de)humanization experiment.
    (Elsevier, 2024) MacDorman, Karl F.
    Gray and Wegner (2012) proposed that when robots look human, their appearance prompts attributions of experience, including sensations and feelings, which is uncanny. This theory, confusingly termed mind perception, differs from perceptual theories of the uncanny valley in that the robots' eeriness is not stimulus-driven. To explore this seminal theory, we conducted a meta-regression analysis of 10 experiments and a (de)humanization experiment. In the first part, experiments were identified in the literature that manipulated artificial entity's experience using descriptions. However, experiments with no observable stimuli yielded larger effects for experience and eeriness than those with robots and virtual reality characters. This finding undermines a theory that purports to explain how a robot's human likeness causes eeriness. Further, a second issue concerns Gray and Wegner's protocol based on a vignette design. Reading about an entity with experience activates thoughts that may not be activated when encountering it, and these thoughts may increase its eeriness. Therefore, the paper's second part focuses on an experiment we conducted with a novel humanization–dehumanization protocol. Participants' attitudes on robots' similarity to humans were gradually shifted to manipulate robots' perceived humanness, experience, and agency. However, the manipulation's effect on eeriness and coldness was mostly nonsignificant or counter to prediction. Differences in the robots' physical appearance had a much larger effect on their eeriness and coldness. In fact, as a mediator, experience mitigated the stimulus's overall effect of increasing eeriness. These results favor perceptual theories, rather than mind perception, in explaining the uncanny valley.
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    A two-branch multi-scale residual attention network for single image super-resolution in remote sensing imagery
    (IEEE, 2024) Patnaik, Allen; Bhuyan, Manas K.; MacDorman, Karl F.
    High-resolution remote sensing imagery finds applications in diverse fields, such as land-use mapping, crop planning, and disaster surveillance. To offer detailed and precise insights, reconstructing edges, textures, and other features is crucial. Despite recent advances in detail enhancement through deep learning, disparities between original and reconstructed images persist. To address this challenge, we propose a two-branch multiscale residual attention network for single-image super-resolution reconstruction. The network gathers complex information about input images from two branches with convolution layers of different kernel sizes. The two branches extract both low-level and high-level features from the input image. The network incorporates multiscale efficient channel attention and spatial attention blocks to capture channel and spatial dependencies in the feature maps. This results in more discriminative features and more accurate predictions. Moreover, residual modules with skip connections can help to overcome the vanishing gradient problem. We trained the proposed model on the WHU-RS19 dataset, collated from Google Earth satellite imagery, and validated it on the UC Merced, RSSCN7, AID, and real-world satellite datasets. The experimental results show that our network uses features at different levels of detail more effectively than state-of-the-art models.
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    Antique Post Card Collecting Provides Connection with History of Butler-Tarkington, and the Greater City
    (Butler-Tarkington Neighborhood Association (BTNA), 2023) Hook , Sara Anne
    This article provides an example of how collecting postcards can result in a primary source for historical research of a specific location.
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    Small and Tall: Sumi-e on Fans and Screens
    (The Sumi-e Society of America, Inc., 2023) Hook , Sara Anne
    This article provides an overview of the tradition of sumi-e painting on fans and screens.
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    Indy Postcard Collector, April 2024
    (Indianapolis Postcard Club, 2024-04) Hook, Sara Anne; Conces, Jr., Dewey J.
    The April 2024 issue of Indy Postcard Collector, published by the Indianapolis Postcard Club, edited by Sara Anne Hook, Professor Emerita
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    Copyright Law for Botanical Artists
    (American Society of Botanical Artists (ASBA), 2024-03) Hook , Sara Anne
    This article discusses the application of copyright law to botanical art/botanical illustration, including the history of copyright law, the rights of copyright owners, the fair use exception and how botanical artists can protect their own artwork and teaching materials.
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    Indy Postcard Collector, April 2023
    (Indianapolis Postcard Club, 2023-04) Hook, Sara Anne
    The April 2023 issue of Indy Postcard Collector, published by the Indianapolis Postcard Club, edited by Sara Anne Hook, Professor Emerita.
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    Indy Postcard Collector, October 2023
    (Indianapolis Postcard Club, 2023-10) Hook , Sara Anne
    The October 2023 issue of Indy Postcard Collector, published by the Indianapolis Postcard Club, edited by Sara Anne Hook, Professor Emerita.