International Philanthropy

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    Grassroots Aid Survey: Key Findings on Small International Development Organizations
    (Lilly Family School of Philanthropy, Indiana University, 2022) Schnable, Allison; Appe, Susan; Richardson, Derek
    This report provides the first national survey data on the programs, finances, and challenges of small and mid-sized international development nonprofits. The data are drawn from the 2021 Grassroots Aid Survey, with a sample of 185 U.S.-based international development organizations with annual budgets of less than $1 million. We summarize key findings and offer a few conclusions for these nonprofits’ own work, the entities that support them, and for future research.
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    Future-Proofing Nonprofits for the Post-Pandemic World
    (2021-02)
    As the one-year anniversary of the pandemic approaches, this report takes account of charities around the world that have been performing their duties under extreme pressure. While many organizations have been forced to close during the past year, those with sustained operations have shown remarkable grit and determination in the face of new challenges caused by the COVID-19 virus. In its sixth COVID-19 survey from December 2–16, 2020, CAF America, in partnership with Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy and The Resource Alliance, polled 805 charitable organizations representing 152 countries to learn about the skills these resilient charities have relied on to persevere and those they are focused on strengthening as they continue to provide services through the pandemic and strive to emerge stronger than before.
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    The Changing Landscape of U.S. Cross-Border Philanthropy-Analytical Report
    (2019-07) Osili, Una; Horvath, Kinga Zsofia; Bergdoll, Jonathan
    This project has four main goals. First, it expands knowledge on U.S. cross-border philanthropy to promote achievement of the objectives of the U.S. Government (USFS, USAID, and others) and the school. Second, it provides a comprehensive landscape of how funding has changed over time and geography, and identify emerging trends in international partnerships and cross-border philanthropy for U.S. Forest Service partners, United States Agency for International Development/American Schools and Hospitals Abroad (USAID/ASHA) partners, and other organizations that have a similar mission and scope. Third, it identifies the policy levers that positively or negatively influence the capacity and propensity of individuals and organizations to engage in cross-border philanthropic activities. Lastly, it seeks to inform USAID/ASHA partners, practitioners, policymakers, scholars, and the general public of the findings from research projects and offer opportunities for greater discussion about the key topics involved.
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    The Changing Landscape of U.S. Cross-Border Philanthropy-Literature Review
    (2019-05) Osili, Una; Horvath, Kinga Zsofia; Bergdoll, Jonathan
    This project has four main goals. First, it will expand knowledge on U.S. cross-border philanthropy to promote achievement of the objectives of the U.S. Government (USFS, USAID, and others) and the school. Second, it will provide a comprehensive landscape of how funding has changed over time and geography, and identify emerging trends in international partnerships and cross-border philanthropy for US Forest Service partners, United States Agency for International Development/American Schools and Hospitals Abroad (USAID/ASHA) partners, and other organizations that have a similar mission and scope. Third, it will identify the policy levers that positively or negatively influence the capacity and propensity of individuals and organizations to engage in cross-border philanthropic activities. Lastly, it will inform USAID/ASHA partners, practitioners, policymakers, scholars, and the general public of the findings from research projects and offer opportunities for greater discussion about the key topics involved.
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    The Changing Landscape of U.S. Cross Border Philanthropy-Research Brief
    (2019-05)
    The Changing Landscape of U.S. Cross-Border Philanthropy report provides an overview of academic literature on U.S. cross-border philanthropy and international partnerships, an analysis of existing data on U.S. international giving, and an analysis of data on the United States Agency for International Development’s Office of American Schools and Hospitals Abroad (USAID/ASHA) applicants and grantees.
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    Preferences for International Redistribution
    (2007-11) Osili; Okten, Cagla
    This paper examines the preferences for international redistribution using unique data from Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) and the Generalized Social Surveys (GSS). The paper finds low rates of private giving to international aid organizations. In addition, most U.S. households support reducing foreign aid rather than increasing assistance to other countries. The authors investigate two main explanations: (1) households may prefer low levels of both private and public giving to international aid organizations and support for global public goods (2) Perceptions of high levels of government giving crowd out private contributions towards global public goods and international aid.
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    Serving, Giving, and Leading Globally: Philanthropic Commitment in Lions Clubs International
    (2012-01) IU Lilly Family School of Philanthropy
    Serving, Giving, and Leading Globally: Philanthropic Commitment in Lions Clubs International aims to explore the dynamics affecting philanthropic engagement and leadership of Lions Clubs International members in 12 countries. Headquartered in the U.S., Lions Clubs International (LCI) is the world’s largest voluntary service-club organization with nearly 1.35 million members in 206 countries. Approximately 23 percent of all Lions clubs members are women, who now play an increasing role in the growth of LCI membership. Lions clubs members are a unique group not only within the U.S. but also in many other countries, identified through their commitment to the mission of LCI: “To empower volunteers to serve their communities, meet humanitarian needs, encourage peace and promote international understanding through Lions clubs.”
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    Serving, Giving, and Leading: Philanthropic Commitment in Lions Clubs International Executive Summary
    (2012-01) IU Lilly Family School of Philanthropy
    Among the first international surveys to focus on philanthropic engagement of service club members, this study reveals that members of Lions Clubs International (LCI) are highly engaged in philanthropy both in the U.S. and abroad. Based on survey data collected from Lions clubs members in 12 countries, this study provides new insights on members’ voluntary service, charitable giving, leadership, and social trust.